Equality, Individualism, and Tolerance: The Essences of a Free and Open Society

When making perfumes, a maître perfumer has to observe certain rules: At first, he selects base, middle and top notes from the spectrum of essential oils (and oftentimes he uses synthetics as well). Then, he mixes the oils together and lets the blend sit for a couple of days. Before diluting the oils with pure alcohol, he wants to make sure the blend is a perfect match.

The master perfumer is highly aware of the fact that each addition can have a material effect on the other notes. Starting with the most basic notes, such as woody, smoky and resinous oils, he creates the “story” of the perfume. It’s the “base notes” that make up a long-lasting and therefore promising scent. From there, the perfumer introduces the middle and top notes into the fragrance. Singling out those middle and top notes is a very delicate exercise since there exists dozens, if not hundreds, thereof.

“Ethics is a little bit like perfumery.”

Ethics is a little bit like perfumery. First, there is the principle of equality, the most momentous discovery of humanity. Equality is concerned with everything that touches on basic human qualities, such as gender, race, religious belief, and sexual orientation. Although we are – quite obviously – not identical, we are equally human! There is no acceptable way of flouting this basic “axiomatic” assumption about humanity. Thus it can be compared to the base notes of a perfume. As much as the “story” of a scent is composed by those fundamental oils, equality makes up the basic structure of humanity: The Old Testament refers to the unity of God’s creation; it’s the stoic idea that everyone is their own master; and legal equality and the necessity of overcoming social prejudice are eventually central motifs in the Age of Reason and Enlightenment.

Second, there is also the principle of individualism embodying the unlimited upside potential of every human being. It allows everyone to develop their skills and to attenuate their weaknesses. Therefore, individualism entails diversity. However, diversity is a challenge for societies since it requires a huge amount of tolerance towards different outcomes. As regards perfumes, middle and top notes must resonate with the base notes, the basic structure of a blend. In fact, as long as every person respects the basic structure of society, according to which all are equal but also infinitely different, the consequences of individualism are compatible with equality, and even a precondition for it.

Present as well as long gone totalitarian dictatorships have shown contempt for either equality (e.g., Nazism) or individualism (e.g., Communism), and in fact most of the time even for both. Their proponents claim that people have to surrender one to get the other. This is blatant nonsense given the fact that the rule of law and free markets have provided both the framework of equality before the law and a clear vision of enabling individuals to pursue happiness. Under these conditions, public and private spheres have become mutually consistent in a historically unprecedented scale. People can now find meaning in their lives because they are allowed to grow their individuality within a fair public order. In contrast, the absolute belief in the state as the final answer is a tragically flawed notion.

”  …if we follow the right formula and choose the essences wisely, we can indeed create a free and open society.”

The radical idea that we need an everlasting “base note” (equality) as well as “middle” (peaceful individualism in all its facets) and “top notes” (tolerance) to create “the most perfect scent” that there can be (a free and open society) is as much a pressing issue today as it ever was. Fundamentally, if we follow the right formula and choose the essences wisely, we can indeed create a free and open society.

The Allegory of the Cave – A Warning Against Political and Ideological Bigotry

Plato’s allegory of the cave (from Republic) is probably the best known simile for truth-seeking. It’s based on a talk between Socrates and Plato’s older brother Glaucon. However, as much as it describes epistemology, it is metaphorically concerned with political corruption and ideological bigotry as well.

Plato’s allegory begins as follows: Socrates is likening the “prisoners” dwelling in a cave to us humans.

“From the beginning people like this have never managed, whether on their own or with the help of others, to see anything besides the shadows that are continually projected on the wall opposite them by the glow of the fire.”

This critical description of humans is fundamental to the allegory. Socrates argues that people consider “real” what they see (artifacts on the wall) and hear (sounds reverberating off the wall), thereby remaining ignorant about the truth.

Now, Plato sets the stage for the philosopher, the wise man, to free the prisoners, one by one, from “their lack of insight”.

At first, the prisoner that is now unchained can’t see the fire (which used to be behind him as the source of the artifacts on the wall). Steadily, though, he gets used to the light of the flame. Then, the prisoner has to be taken out of the cave into daylight, sometimes against his will. As described by Plato, this will often be a very hurtful process; knowledge can indeed be uncomfortable and deterrent to those who don’t want to see it. And because it is this way, sometimes people will even turn around and go back into darkness. This must be what Immanuel Kant meant when he was referring to enlightenment as overcoming cowardice and laziness (“sapere aude”). In addition, there is no shortcut to acquiring knowledge about the world than profound and radical educational efforts, as pointed out by the Prussian thinker Wilhelm von Humboldt. 

“No, however, if someone, using force, were to pull him (who had been freed from his chains) away from there and to drag him up the cave’s rough and steep ascent and not to let go of him until he had dragged him out into the light of the sun, would not the one who had been dragged like this feel, in the process, pain and rage?”

Being in the daylight, the former prisoner needs to get accustomed to the alien brightness. Once he is able to see though, he will see the things themselves. At first, these things might be the stars and the moon in the night sky since they are more pleasant to look at than the sun.

Eventually, the liberated (and emancipated) person will be able to stare into the sun itself, being able “to contemplate of what sort [she] is”. He will consider himself lucky to have found wisdom while condemning the other prisoners for remaining blind to the truth.

Now, the allegory is getting more political. Socrates is asking Glaucon:

“Do you think the one who had gotten out of the cave would still envy those within the cave and would want to compete with them who are esteemed and who have power?”

For the emancipated prisoner going back into the cave would become “filling his eyes with darkness” again. Furthermore, the rare sparkle of wisdom in his eyes would cause ridicule among the prisoners. And if he dared to drag them into the light as well, the moment his hands tried to get hold of them, they would kill him.

The quintessence in Plato’s simile is that truth may sometimes hurt the holders of outdated beliefs and views. More importantly, though, truth may not always prevail and may eventually be sacrificed (together with the protagonists that were trying to advance their ideas) on the altar of political power and ideological bigotry.

Warum man seinen Cappuccino rasch trinken sollte…

Zeit fasziniert mich. Wer sich näher mit dem Phänomen der Zeit beschäftigt, merkt, dass wir eigentlich nur sehr wenig davon verstehen. Was ist Zeit? Welche Elemente machen unser Zeitgefühl aus? Und weshalb ist unser landläufiges Verständnis von Zeit so anders als dasjenige der Physik?

Zeit ist die Uhr des Lebens

3 Milliarden Mal schlägt unser Herz im Durschnitt; anschliessend sind wir tot. Die Zahl ist zwar riesig, doch stimmt sie uns zugleich nachdenklich. Zeit wird gemeinhin als “kostbar” empfunden. Und weil sie für jeden Menschen gleichermassen gilt, kommt ihr anders als materiellem Reichtum eine egalisierende Wirkung zu. So verstanden ist Zeit die grosse philosophische (resp. theologische) Nivellierung; ein Naturgesetz also, nach dem sich jeder zu richten hat.

Drei Konzepte der Zeit möchte ich im Folgenden anschauen:

Erstens: Zeit in der alltäglichen Wahrnehmung

Wir haben ein klares Verständnis davon, dass Zeit eine Aneinanderreihung von Momenten ist, der wir hilflos ausgesetzt sind. Diese spezifische Art der Wahrnehmung der Zeit gibt uns das Gefühl der Vergangenheit und der Zukunft, und dass es scheinbar nur eine Richtung der Zeit gibt, nämlich von der Vergangenheit über die Gegenwart in die Zukunft (“Pfeil der Zeit”).

“Eine Sandburg, die einmal zerstört ist, baut sich nicht von selbst wieder auf.”

Eine Sandburg, die einmal zerstört ist, baut sich nicht von selbst wieder auf. Auf jeden Fall hat dies niemand bisher beobachten können. Physiker führen die wahrgenommene Richtung der Zeit auf die Zunahme der Entropie (Mass der Unordnung) im Universum zurück. Einem Cappuccino gleich, der zu Beginn eine klare Trennung von Kaffee und Milchschaum kennt, jedoch allmählich zu diffundieren beginnt, wird das Universum mit der Zeit, ausgehend vom Big Bang, “unordentlicher”. Diese Annahme wird getroffen, weil es mehr Wege gibt und damit wahrscheinlicher ist, dass sich Unordentlichkeit einstellt als dass sich die Bausteine dieser Welt spontan zu etwas “Ordentlichem” formen, wie etwa zu Galaxien, Planeten, Menschen, Hühnereiern oder eben Sandburgen.

Entsprechend folgen wir auch intuitiv einer chronologischen Abfolge, wenn wir von Erlebnissen erzählen (Ursache-Wirkung bzw. Kausalität). Beispielsweise stecken wir uns zuerst mit einer Grippe im Büro an (oder verlieben uns), die in der Folge zu einer Erkrankung führt (zur Beziehung), welche wir schliesslich mit Medikamenten und Bettruhe zu Hause erfolgreich behandeln (Trennung…).

Der tägliche Sprachgebrauch ist ein Indikator dafür, wie bedeutsam Zeit zur abstrakten Ordnung unserer Erlebnisse und zu deren Kommunikation mit anderen Menschen ist: Beispielsweise können wir uns problemlos um 20:00 Uhr verabreden; wir sprechen von “vorher” und “nachher” und verstehen ganz genau, was unser Gegenüber damit meint; und schliesslich ist uns Menschen der Nordhalbkugel klar, was es bedeutet, wenn die Blumen blühen (Frühling), die Hitze einkehrt (Sommer), die Blätter der Bäume sich rot färben (Herbst) oder der erste Schnee fällt (Winter).

Zeit ist im Alltag allgegenwärtig, als ob wir über einen Ort, einen Menschen oder unsere Gefühle sprechen würden. Ohne temporale Begrifflichkeiten als sprachliches Hilfsmittel wäre ein Grossteil unserer Kommunikation un- oder zumindest missverständlich. Wir haben uns darum auf einen sprachlichen Standard geeinigt, welcher dem Faktor Zeit einen bedeutenden semantischen Platz einräumt.

Zweitens: Zeit als psychologisches Phänomen

Umgekehrt begreifen wir Zeit auf eine Weise, die nicht zwingend mit der objektiven Realität der Zeit übereinstimmen muss. So stellen wir fest, dass wir Zeit anders wahrgenommen haben, als wir noch Kinder waren. Erinnern wir uns doch einmal zurück an unseren ersten Urlaub am Meer – wie unendlich lang uns dieser doch vorkam! Dieses rein intuitive Gefühl ist tatsächlich real, wie Psychologen nachweisen konnten. Demnach nehmen Kinder grundsätzlich den Zeitverlauf langsamer wahr als ältere Menschen. Tatsache ist, dass Kinder alle Erfahrungen zum ersten Mal machen müssen; wenn wir hingegen älter werden, besitzen wir mehr Routine und viele Dinge kommen uns wie “déjà-vus” vor. Dies kann dazu führen, dass uns der Zeitablauf schneller vorkommt.

Andererseits nehmen wir die Zeit als langsamer verstreichend wahr, wenn wir gelangweilt in einem Flugzeug zu sitzen haben, bevor wir endlich am Strand liegen können. Die “Zeit totschlagen” kann damit rasch zur Hauptaufgabe bei Langeweile werden. Beim Lesen einer interessanten Lektüre oder in einem Moment der Anspannung, wie etwa an einer Prüfung, vergeht hingegen die Zeit “wie im Flug”.

Paradoxerweise erscheinen uns retrospektiv allerdings oft gerade die spannenden Zeiten als sehr langwierige Perioden, wohingegen die ereignisarmen Phasen nur schlecht in unserer Erinnerung zu haften vermögen.

Unser Gehirn ist auch die Quelle, die uns ein extrem starkes subjektives Gegenwartsgefühl gibt, wobei der Gegenwartsmoment immer nur eine rein logische Annahme ist und nicht der objektiven Realität entsprechen kann, weist doch jeder Reiz eine minimale Übertragungsverzögerung von wenigen Milli- oder sogar bloss Mikrosekunden auf. Wir leben also (biologisch streng genommen) immer in der Vergangenheit!

Wir leben also (biologisch streng genommen) immer in der Vergangenheit!

Drittens: Zeit als messbare Grösse

In der Physik ist Zeit schliesslich eine messbare Grösse. Das Messen der Zeit findet mittels Uhren statt. Wesensmerkmal von Uhren ist dabei eine Periodizität in ihrer Funktionsweise. So misst der Herzschlag etwa unsere Lebenszeit, die Sonne (in Relation zur Erde) die Tageslänge, der Mond (in Relation zur Erde) den Monat und der Umlauf der Erde um die Sonne das Jahr. Menschen nutzten diese Naturerscheinungen bereits sehr früh, um Uhren zu bauen (z.B. Sonnen-, Sand- und Wasseruhren) und Kalender zu konstruieren (z.B. Stonehenge [umstritten], Islamischer Mondkalender, Gregorianischer Sonnenkalender). Mechanische Uhren kamen erst viel später als Zeitmesser hinzu.

Diese Uhren sind allerdings relativ ungenau, da sie den unterschiedlichsten Kräften und Veränderungen ausgesetzt sind, wie etwa Schwankungen der Lufttemperatur oder des Luftdrucks. Demgegenüber sind Atomuhren weniger störungsanfällig, da sie auf den Schwingungen der zerfallenden Atome beruhen. Dieser Kleinstbereich ist deutlich weniger “noisy”.

Bei Isaac Newton waren Zeit und Raum noch feste Konstanten. Albert Einstein räumte aber mit der Newtonschen Theorie auf, indem er aufzeigte, dass die Raumzeit eine eigene Dimension darstellt, die abhängig vom Betrachter lediglich relativ gilt. Grundsätzlich bedeutet dies, dass die Zeit nicht für alle Menschen dieselbe, sondern abhängig von der Geschwindigkeit des untersuchten Systems und die ihn umgebende Gravitation ist. Dies führt zur von Einstein berechneten Zeitdilatation. Damit stellt die Physik die Zeit als universelle Konstante in Frage. Entsprechend sprechen Physiker heute von einer bloss subjektiven Auffassung davon, was Zeit darstellt, oder sogar von einer Illusion!

Zeit und menschliches Bewusstsein werden damit auf eine ähnliche Ebene gestellt. Über beide Phänomene wissen wir heute nur wenig.

“Zeit und menschliches Bewusstsein werden damit auf eine ähnliche Ebene gestellt. Über beide Phänomene wissen wir heute nur wenig.”

“Primitives” Verständnis von Zeit genügt oft…

Zeit ist eine ungemein facettenreiche Idee. Für den Nichtphysiker genügt allerdings das Konzept der Zeit, wie wir sie im Alltag wahrnehmen. Diese Auffassung ist sozusagen real genug und lässt uns genügend effizient und fehlerlos miteinander kommunizieren. Auf jeden Fall hindert uns unser “primitives” Zeitverständnis nicht daran, die Komplexität eines Cappuccinos wertschätzen zu können!